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Custom Growth Solutions, LLC | Sandler Training | Oklahoma City, OK
 

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Self Development

One of the activities I've done in the past is the Tough Mudder obstacle course. If you haven't heard of it, it's an endurance event in which participants attempt an obstacle course that's about ten or twelve miles long.

When I was first introduced to Sandler years ago, one of the first things they told us we should do was journal. I heard, "If you really want to be successful in Sandler, and you want to continually get better, you need to journal."

I can usually tell fairly early on when a prospect is not going to embrace the Sandler methodology. Of course, some people take time to warm up to it, but other times there are red flags for me that they'll be highly resistant.

 

Have you ever spent time and energy on something, and if you're honest about it, it wasn't helping you move toward any of your goals? Or maybe you've become overwhelmed with to-do lists?

I'm fortunate enough to work with a large number of salespeople and business owners. One of the things I often help them with is analyzing their behaviors to set themselves up for success.

One company that I worked for earlier in my career had a certain type of training and philosophy that I've seen a lot of times in other businesses since.

Are there times in your business when you have more and less work to do? Sure. You might even have a "busy" season and a “slow” season.

What kinds of head trash do you bring into your work life? Are you worried your business is too small to catch the eye of a particular prospect? Afraid you won't be able to keep up with an increase in demand? Hesitant to try out a new prospecting method because it might blow up in your face? 

Whether it affects you in business or your personal life, most of what we at Sandler refer to as "head trash" comes from something we've been exposed to or something that has been done to us. Now, that doesn't necessarily mean it was done to us with negative or malicious intent, it's just the experiences we've had.

 

One of my clients suggested a meeting from 10-11 AM recently, and his prospect assumed my client was offering to meet up at either time—not that my client was setting the boundaries for an hour-long meeting!

Have you ever been frustrated by a friend or a colleague who was limited in life by the things they heard when they were young? Or you know someone who thinks they can do no wrong no matter what they do?

If you're familiar with transactional analysis, you probably know that most people don't put conscious effort into the transactional analysis they experience. You should, though. Transactional analysis affects too much of the way you interact with the world for you to ignore it.

Think of something you’ve agreed with in the last week. It could be something simple like someone commenting on the weather, or something as complicated as a business plan. Now think about something you encountered in the last week you immediately disagreed with. Was it something you saw on the news, something from an article you read, or something you heard someone say? Maybe all three?

One of the things we talk about a lot in Sandler is an abundance mindset versus a scarcity mindset. Typically organizations and individuals operate either from a mindset of scarcity or a mindset of abundance. That can really steer an entire organization. However, it can also allow an individual salesperson to have more freedom.

David Sandler knew that salespeople needed to feel okay about themselves in order to truly be effective at sales. And one of the ways that comes into play is with your goals. If you rarely hit your goals, it's going to lower your self-esteem!

Even though they may not be clearly defined, you likely have some long term objectives for yourself, your family, your career, your business, etc. Recently I heard some advice about being insincere that bothered me greatly and has since I heard it.

Do you want more out of 2014 than you got out of 2013? More money, more free time, more respect, more friends, more whatever? If you are like over 90% of the population there is something you said you would achieve in 2013 that you fell short on - why do you think only 10% did not fall short? It is because they have desire, commitment and follow the 6 simple steps we outline in this column.

Success is created by changing your habits. Of course, that doesn't come instantly. It takes time to change habits. So how can we change our habits in sales? As it turns out, we can actually look towards doctors as an example of how to change our habits.

How often have you listened as someone rationalized his or her mishandling of a problem by externalizing its source: I can't meet my projections because . . ., My territory isn't large enough, or Our prices are too high? Closer scrutiny almost always reveals the source of the problem to be internal, stemming from the salesperson's concept of self specifically, a state of mind that prevents him or her from trying to break through his/her success barrier. This state of mind is their comfort zone.

Do you want more out of 2013 than you got out of 2012? More money, more free time, more respect, more friends, more whatever? If you are like over 90% of the population there is something you said you would achieve in 2012 that you fell short on why do you think only 10% did not fall short? It is because they have desire, commitment and follow the 6 simple steps we outline in this column.